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Resources Books

Demilitarization for Deep Decarbonization: Reducing Militarism and Military Expenditures...

by Tamara Lorincz, Senior IPB Researcher, September 2014, 80pp

 

To help countries chart a path to low-carbon energy systems and economies, the UN launched the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP). However most of the military sector’s fuel consumption and emissions are excluded from national greenhouse gas inventories. In Demilitarization for Deep Decarbonization: Reducing Militarism and Military Expenditures to Invest in the UN Green Climate Fund and to Create Low-Carbon Economies and Resilient Communities, IPB argues that war must stop for global warming to slow down. Military expenditures must be reduced and re-directed for climate finance to create low carbon economies and climate-resilient communities. Disarmament must take place alongside mitigation and adaptation.

Opportunity Costs: Military Spending and the UN Development Agenda

By Colin Archer and Annette Willi, 2012

 

IPB wrote a Position Paper entitled Opportunity Costs: Military Spending and the UN's Development Agenda. It makes the case that military spending should be taken into consideration in the debate now under way on the UN's Post-2015 Development Agenda (following on from the Millennium Development Goals). In IPB's view, militarization is a significant factor in the sustainable development equation, often undermining the security of citizens. At the same time, the massive resources devoted to the military sector could - if even a small portion were reallocated - make a major contribution to meeting the challenges of mass poverty, unemployment and climate change.

 

Nuclear weapons: at what cost?

Ben Cramer, 2009, 150pp

 

Nuclear weapons not only threaten massive destruction, but they also incur enormous costs. Apart from the damage caused by blast, fire and radioactive fallout from actual use in warfare, the weapons impose major financial, moral and political costs on nuclear weapons states and countries that host the weapons. The US alone spends annually over US$ 50 billion on its nuclear arsenal, and the global annual total is around  $90 billion. At a time of global economic crisis, when the international community is also struggling to come up with ways to respond to climate challenge and dwindling energy resources, can this be the right use of public money? Nuclear Weapons: At What Cost? offers a survey of the costs of the nuclear weapons programmes of all the relevant states

Whose priorities? A guide campaigners on military and social spending

Colin Archer, 2007, 74pp


Whose-Priorities sketches some approaches to campaigning in opposition to militarism, and offer summary accounts of 18 projects undertaken by civil society groups around the world.

 

This book is available in Arabic, Catalan, German and Spanish.

 

Warfare or Welfare?

Colin Archer and David Hay-Edie, 2005, 96pp

 

Disarmament for Development in the 21th Century. A human security approach

Warfare or Welfare sets out information and arguments that form the basis of our DforD programme. The two main issues addressed are military spending and the effects of weapon systems on development.

 

Translations in French, German and Arabic are available on request

From War to Peace

Caroline Guinard, 2002, Co-published by the IPB and Nonviolence International, 176pp


From War to Peace Summary is a practical handbook for peace negotiators, either governmental or non state actors, drawing on nine specific country studies of transitions from armed conflict to peace.

Read the summary of findings here.

Peace is Possible

Fredrik S. Heffermehl, 2000


Peace is Possible aims at showing, with personal stories and practical experience recounted by people like Nelson Mandela, his holiness the Dalai Lama, Jody Williams, Daniel Ellsberg, Howard Zinn, and unknown grassroots activists, that everyone can find their way to contribute, and that the peace movement makes a real difference in today's world.

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